Simple Changes = Greater Impact

This blog represents a concept called Reverse Engineering. In the examples below you will see and learn how to reverse engineer an ad campaign. The examples point out how design principles such as images, type, color, contrast, alignment and layout can enhance the impact an ad has on those who will view it.

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Provided by Rangefinder Magazine – Tamron

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Important Decision Maker

This ad is intended to target those who are professional photographers and those who are seeking to become professional photographer. The important factors of a quality professional lens is the quality of the glass and the maximum aperture offered. In this ad the one item that should stand out beyond the portrait and the lens picture is the lens specs “SP70-200mm F/2.8 G2.  This will be one of the most important factors a professional will look for first when viewing ads.

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Photo by Ken Ockler

 

Why I Chose What I Chose

I chose to simplify the ad so that the critical information became more of the key feature. Using principles of design I created a left-to-right flow by using the models elbow to direct the eye to the key factor of “SP70-200mm F/2.8 G2.  The contrast of her dress draws your eye to her and then left-to-right flow takes you to the text.

I added a little bit of a drop shadow to create contrast on the text that overlaps the portrait. This was included so that it didn’t blend into the background like the original ad, making it a little difficult to read. I chose a portrait that has more contrast and detail so that it would emphasize the quality of the lens. The lens picture remains small because the image is not as important as the key factor and quality of the lens.

TAMRON top quality glass and high performance equals quality images.

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